This blog is about maps, fictional or otherwise. Enjoy.
oinkwiping:

Updated marriage equality map! Congrats Michigan!!

oinkwiping:

Updated marriage equality map! Congrats Michigan!!

fishingboatproceeds:

jtotheizzoe:

ellejohara:

jtotheizzoe:

fishingboatproceeds:

memorylikeaweapon:

Can we just take a moment to appreciate the Fuller Projection?
This map presents a world that is nearly contiguous and at accurate sizes and shapes to the continents. And there is no “correct” orientation for it (the directionality of north/south being arbitrary after all )
The downsides are that it cuts up Antarctica and distorts the size of oceans, which is bad news for sailors and penguin researchers, but for geography in general it’s AWESOME
(X)

Created by Buckminster Fuller, writer of a gajillion books, owner of a gajillion patents, and the man whose name gave us Buckyballs.

I love this for (at least) two reasons:
1) I feel like if extra-terrestrials ever approached our solar system, they would do so from either the top or bottom (as relative to Earth’s North Pole at least, itself being relative to what we decide to call “top”) so as to avoid collisions/close passes with asteroidal flotsam and cometary jetsam. They’d have a 50% chance of seeing Earth from (half of) this perspective, so we should understand what our world would look like from up/down there.
2) I really love the idea of a flat world where all corners are inhospitable prisons of ice and snow. Sci-fi premise unlocked.

This is not the Fuller Projection. This is.
This pictured above is the Peirce Quincuncial.
I’m just sayin’ since the Fuller Projection is my favorite, and the one pictured above certainly ain’t it.
And yeah, I have shoes with toes.

This is why I love Tumblr, because I can find out that I am totally wrong (someone should tell John Green he is wrong too) and I can not only not feel bad about it, I learn something in the process. It’s like, life man.

I WAS WRONG. Thank you, Ellejohara!

fishingboatproceeds:

jtotheizzoe:

ellejohara:

jtotheizzoe:

fishingboatproceeds:

memorylikeaweapon:

Can we just take a moment to appreciate the Fuller Projection?

This map presents a world that is nearly contiguous and at accurate sizes and shapes to the continents.
And there is no “correct” orientation for it (the directionality of north/south being arbitrary after all )

The downsides are that it cuts up Antarctica and distorts the size of oceans, which is bad news for sailors and penguin researchers, but for geography in general it’s AWESOME

(X)

Created by Buckminster Fuller, writer of a gajillion books, owner of a gajillion patents, and the man whose name gave us Buckyballs.

I love this for (at least) two reasons:

1) I feel like if extra-terrestrials ever approached our solar system, they would do so from either the top or bottom (as relative to Earth’s North Pole at least, itself being relative to what we decide to call “top”) so as to avoid collisions/close passes with asteroidal flotsam and cometary jetsam. They’d have a 50% chance of seeing Earth from (half of) this perspective, so we should understand what our world would look like from up/down there.

2) I really love the idea of a flat world where all corners are inhospitable prisons of ice and snow. Sci-fi premise unlocked.

This is not the Fuller Projection. This is.

This pictured above is the Peirce Quincuncial.

I’m just sayin’ since the Fuller Projection is my favorite, and the one pictured above certainly ain’t it.

And yeah, I have shoes with toes.

This is why I love Tumblr, because I can find out that I am totally wrong (someone should tell John Green he is wrong too) and I can not only not feel bad about it, I learn something in the process. It’s like, life man.

I WAS WRONG. Thank you, Ellejohara!

(Source: faqitol)

policymic:

Stunning interactive map shows Earth’s weather patterns 

The current season has been harsh for many: Freezing temperatures and heavy snowfall in the U.S., wild storms and flooding in Europe and blazing heat and bushfires in Australia. It can be hard to appreciate the wonderful intricacies of Earth’s weather systems while they’re causing you to suffer. But this stunning visualization may change your perspective. Created by programmer Cameron Beccario, the data comes in every three hours from the supercomputers of the Global Forecast System, the same number crunchers that provide our news weather forecasts each night. 

The most stunning aspect of the interactive is its detail. You can change the altitude to look at winds in different layers of the atmosphere. Clicking on the “Earth” button will present a feast of options for showing different map projections or data overlays. In addition to wind, you can look at ocean currents, temperature, humidity, air density and more. You can also change the time to examine extreme past weather events like Superstorm Sandy, or go forward to look at future forecasts.

Read more | Follow policymic

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(via upworthy)

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